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Does new blink science explain eye-closure fractionation?

Written by Joy Livingwell, 3 January 2013
Comments: 1

You blink far more often than necessary to keep your eyes clean and moist. Scientists have discovered that the timing of your blinks relates to what you’re doing and experiencing.

Now new research suggests that each blink allows your brain to rest momentarily.

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Study: Empathy represses analytic thought, & vice versa

Written by Joy Livingwell, 31 October 2012
Comments: none

Research in neuropsychology continues to shed more light on how and why NLP processes work:

Empathy Represses Analytic Thought, and Vice Versa: Brain Physiology Limits Simultaneous Use of Both Networks

ScienceDaily (Oct. 30, 2012) — New research shows a simple reason why even the most intelligent, complex brains can be taken by a swindler’s story — one that upon a second look offers clues it was false.

When the brain fires up the network of neurons that allows us to empathize, it suppresses the network used for analysis, a pivotal study led by a Case Western Reserve University researcher shows.

How could a CEO be so blind to the public relations fiasco his cost-cutting decision has made?

When the analytic network is engaged, our ability to appreciate the human cost of our action is repressed.

At rest, our brains cycle between the social and analytical networks. But when presented with a task, healthy adults engage the appropriate neural pathway, the researchers found.

The study shows for the first time that we have a built-in neural constraint on our ability to be both empathetic and analytic at the same time.

This study has a lot of interesting implications.

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New free font helps people with dyslexia

Written by Joy Livingwell, 19 October 2012
Comments: none

Since dyslexia is typically labeled a learning disability, I find it fascinating that fonts with heavier strokes on the bottom of the letters help many dyslexic people read more easily, with less page-flipping. Below is a recent example: the free OpenDyslexic font developed by mobile app designer Abelardo Gonzalez. Seems to me this is yet […]

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Why inner game ISN’T everything

Written by Joy Livingwell, 1 October 2012
Comments: none

As a NLPer I see and hear a lot of “do your inner work and the outer will take care of itself” type of advice. I think it’s crap.

While inner game alone can dramatically change how you feel, it’s only when you change what you do that you start affecting other people and the world, and generating better real-world results. Inner game can help you act more easily and more effectively… but only when you actually get off your butt and take action.

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Can you really unjam traffic by driving smart?!

Written by Joy Livingwell, 12 September 2012
Comments: none

Stuck on long commutes, engineer William Beaty did some elegant analysis of driver behavior and its consequences. He figured out how even one driver can sometimes unjam traffic jams.

I have tried Beaty’s methods myself on a few stretches of San Francisco Bay Area freeway where traffic tends to jam up. And while I can’t unjam a big jam, there have been times when I’ve been able to unjam small jams, or at least make a jam smaller or get it to move faster.

A lot of NLP is about changing other people’s behavior and improving their outcomes by changing your behavior. I like to think of Beaty’s driving technique as NLP for traffic.

To understand more about how you can unjam traffic, with diagrams, visit Beaty’s website TrafficWaves.org

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The right way to speak to yourself

Written by Joy Livingwell, 29 August 2012
Comments: none

I’m always on the lookout for ways to build people up and encourage them, rather than shutting them down. That’s why Peter Bregman’s post The Right Way to Speak to Yourself delighted me. Excerpt:

It felt so good to be in that classroom, I didn’t want to leave. Eventually though, when it was clearly time to go, I left with a smile on my face that remained long after I had gone.

Sitting in that classroom was a lesson in people management; the positive way Dorit interacted with the children is a great model for how managers should interact with employees.

But, for me, the morning was more profound than a lesson in managing other people. It was a lesson in managing myself.

As I left the classroom I found myself thinking about whether I treat myself the way Dorit treated her students. Am I encouraging? Do I catch myself doing things right as often as doing things wrong? And when I do something wrong, do I simply move on or do I dwell on it, haranguing myself?

In other words, what kind of classroom is going on in your head?

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“Being a good person” is an ongoing process

Written by Joy Livingwell, 26 November 2011
Comments: 3

In this 12-minute talk, Jay Smooth makes some excellent suggestions for switching important aspects of one’s self-concept from digital to analog:

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Lessons learned from Tom Hoobyar

Written by Joy Livingwell, 30 September 2011
Comments: none

This is my tribute to the late Tom Hoobyar — a wonderful, generous, warm-hearted man who died 25 September 2011. Tom’s daughter Tracy asked people to post lessons they’d learned from Tom, who was an entrepreneur, NLPer, and teacher and mentor to many. Here are mine.

The main lessons I learned from Tom were:

  1. Tom didn’t let his own mistakes or setbacks prevent him from being a leader, teacher, and mentor. I used to think I had screwed up too much to teach or lead. Tom was one of the people who helped me learn that my mistakes and challenges, lived through, become benefits with which I can help other people deal with similar issues more gracefully.

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Update: NLP Cafe founder Tom Hoobyar dead of cancer

Written by Joy Livingwell, 25 September 2011
Comments: 2

Tom Hoobyar, the founder of the orginal NLP Cafe (a practice group for NLP and hypnosis skills), died this morning, 25 September 2011, of stage 4 pancreatic cancer.

Join Tom’s support community here:
http://www.facebook.com/groups/250177441679151/

Make a donation to help the family with Tom’s enormous medical expenses here:
http://www.gofundme.com/for-the-love-of-tom

Those of us who know and love Tom can count ourselves blessed to have enjoyed so much time with this wonderful man.

Joy

Updates in the comments:

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NLP Cafe founder Tom Hoobyar dying of pancreatic cancer

Written by Joy Livingwell, 24 September 2011
Comments: none

Tom Hoobyar, the founder of the orginal NLP Cafe (a practice group for NLP and hypnosis skills), has died. has stage 4 pancreatic cancer. He is on life support in Reno, Nevada, no longer able to speak, and dying.

Tom helped thousands of people in the NLP community. Because of Tom, NLP Cafes became a worldwide phenomenon.

Follow Tom’s story and join his support community here:
http://www.facebook.com/groups/250177441679151/

Make a donation to help with Tom’s medical expenses here:
http://www.gofundme.com/for-the-love-of-tom

NLPer Maryam Webster posted this on Tom’s Facebook page:

One of the greatest and kindest men alive, Tom Hoobyar an earth angel and benefactor to nearly everyone I know, is down with metastatic pancreatic cancer. Tom’s care is monstrously expensive and draining the family coffers dry. If you DONATE $150 or more BEFORE NOVEMBER 1st, email me & I WILL GIVE YOU a customized Super-Ninja-Skills transformation coaching package valued at $500 on ANY topic, personal or business.

If you want to see Tom before he goes, visit NOW, in the next few days.

Those of us who know and love Tom can count ourselves blessed to have enjoyed so much time with this wonderful man.

Joy

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